Citi ThankYou Preferred Card – 40,000 ThankYou Point Bonus

(Update: This promotion is now expired) For a limited time only, the Citi ThankYou Preferred Card is offering new cardholders a 40,000 ThankYou point bonus. Forty thousand sure sounds like a ton of points, but be careful because the ThankYou rewards network does not translate like other rewards programs.  100 points does not equal $1 cash in returns but 40,000 ThankYou points can be redeemed for $400 in gift cards.

To obtain the bonus, new cardholders must do the following:

  1. Spend $3,000 in the first six months of opening the account (20,000 ThankYou points given)
  2. Spend $3,000 in the next six months (20,000 ThankYou points given)

One of the other big benefits to the Citi ThankYou Preferred Card is that it has no annual fee.  Many cards with big bonuses slowly get their money back in high annual fees and Citi does not charge one here.  The variable APR is 12.99% – 22.99% and one ThankYou point is earned on every dollar spent on all purchases.  The added benefit of an anniversary bonus (up to 3% bonus each year on the points you’ve already earned) increases the already high value on this Citi card.

Of all the credit cards on the market today, The Citi ThankYou Preferred is the only one to have a delayed bonus like the one you see above.  Spending $3,000 in six months (twice) ensures that you’ll continuously use the card, which is what Citi is after.  Too often, cardholders sign-up for a card only to use a few times so the bonus is obtained, and this kind of action causes all cardholders to receive less perks, and more expensive service.  If you have a big purchase around the corner or are looking for a new rewards credit card, give the Citi ThankYou Preferred Card strong consideration.

Featured image by muffintinmom



Last Edited: February 25, 2013 @ 3:11 pm
About Michael Pruser

Michael Pruser is the man. After spending a ton of money to go to the private University of Miami, Michael now enjoys spending time at home, writing personal finance articles for the world to read. His journey out of debt continues 500 words at a time.